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20130127
20130127
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
, drones can be more useful in that kind of environment. our allies seem to want to take the lead. but we're going to have to be much more supportive than we're now willing to be in that area. and we're going to have to think hard about other places like syria. >> right. >> where there's, you know, a massive loss of life, 60,000 already. and we're hanging back there. again, i think out of reluctance to get too involved because of the slippery slope that in the end will have to be militarily involved and the people and the president have better things to do. >> a piece in "the wall street journal" this week saying basically there's too much reaction to iraq and inaction here he compares to the first president bush not doing anything about the shiite uprising in iraq in 1991, which he argued led ultimately to the second gulf war. i think that may be an area where people would debate, but what are the consequences of the u.s. hanging back in syria? >> well, if we hang back in syria, there could be a dissent into chaos. it's already headed in that direction. again, the rise of these islamic j
faced by all american officials operating overseas, how to remain active in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenged for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and, most importantly, cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of s
for border security. i mean, there are citizens in my state who do not live in a secure environment. we live in a pretty secure environment here, certainly in the senate, we've got guards and there's people every night in the part -- the southern part of my state that have drug traffickers and people going across, the guns. >> so how do you convince republicans about the path to citizenship? >> well, look, i'll give you a little straight talk. look at the last election. look at the last election. we are losing dramatically the hispanic vote, which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons, and we've got to understand that. second of all, this -- we can't go on forever with 11 million people living in this country in the shadows in an illegal status. we cannot forever have children who were born here -- who were brought here by their parents when they were small children to live in the shadows, as well. so i think the time is right. by the way, we just acted to avert a nuclear option in the senate. believe it or not, i see some glimmer of bipartisanship out there. >> how about we've go
from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, our security at home is threatened. >> i thought that was such -- that's hillary clinton testifying this week and i thought that line was so important because it kind of disstills down i think the operational theory in intervention here or american leadership, which is when america is absent, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, security at home is threatened. horace, that seems like a proposition you don't agree with and libya was a failed implementation of that view. >> first of all, hillary clinton has a very short memory, so the kind of leadership she's talking about, we have to be very clear, what kind of leadership we want in africa. the people in africa want peace. they want unity and they want reconstruction. they do not want wars. and what happened in libya is a sign of the kind of militarism we've seen all over africa from the u.s. africa command. 50,000 libyans have been killed out of this intervention. the w
ceo survey released this week, 52% saw no change from the current tepid economic environment. 28% saw decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery followed by slow downs of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa have made people weary of excessive optimism. things are stable, crises have been contained, there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we've turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos. no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, by the way. they just had their first year with $50 billion in revenues. underlying this caution, i believe, is a sense that growth that people had gotten used to, economic growth of the past that countries and companies had hoped for in the future just doesn't seem likely. the imf released a new report this week with growth numbers that are low. lower th
combat leaders and actually creates an environment because of their living conditions that is not conducive to readiness. >> reporter: others claim women suffer more combat casualties than illnesses and pregnancy is an issue. to senator john mccain, it's equal standards for certain demanding jobs. >> i think women are obviously -- are prepared to serve side by side with men in combat. i just want to emphasize, though, there should be the same physical and mental standards for anyone to perform certain roles and functions in the military. >> reporter: many say it's a question of equal rights and serving in combat allows a soldier to advance through the ranks, farther and faster. >> the bottom line is we need to treat people like individuals. what are the capabilities they bring to the fight, including physical strength, plus courage, plus aptitude, plus leadership and all the things we need for the most effective fighting force. >> reporter: military service chiefs have until may 15 to make their case about which jobs if any should still exclude women. >> jamie: steve c
there which puts a burden on the small unit combat leaders, and actually creates an environment because of their living conditions that is not conducive to readiness. others claim women suffer more than men and that pregnancy is an issue. to senator john mccain it's really a question of equal standards for certain demanding jobs. >> i think women obviously are prepared to serve side by side with men in combat. i just want to emphasize though there shouldn't be the same physical and mental standards for anyone to perform certain roles and functions in the military many women say it's just a question of equal rights since serving in combat allows the soldiers to advance through the ranks farther and faster. >> we need to treat people like individuals. what are the capabilities they bring to the fight, which includes physical strengths, plus courage, plus aptitude, plus leadership and all the other things we need to have the most effective fighting force. >> military chiefs now until may 15th to make their case to the defense secretary about which jobs if any should still exclude women, he
environment. 28% saw a decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year, when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery, followed by slowdowns of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa, have made people wary of excessive optimism. these are stable, crises have been contained. there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we have turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos this year, no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, they just had that their first year with $50 billion in revenue. it's a sense of growth that people have gotten used to, growth that companies have hoped for in the future just doesn't seem likely. growth numbers that are low, lower than they had projected only a few months ago. the world is coming to grips with the fact that the financial crisis might have ushered in not a few years, but a decades of slow growth. and we're not
, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root. our interests suffer. our security at home is threatened. >> i think she is trying to warn the administration and the world that we cannot retreat from this engagement here. and right now, overnight, we've seen that the u.s. is doing refueling of french fighters in mali, which is very troublesome to some. it is a much more aggressive posture. but the uk has taken all of their nationals out of somalia overnight. this area of north africa as bob and ted were just saying is the most dangerous perhaps in the world, aside from pakistan and afghanistan which are nuclear armed against each other. and pakistan and india nuclear armed against each other and what's happening in afghanistan as we retreat and the effect on that and north korea. so they have to really not just look at immigration and guns and the budget as the next challenges here. >> have we figured out, senator, what the balance is between invasions, nation building, a huge commitment on the part of the united states in this part of the world, and t
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)